First Announcement


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First Announcement Congress Poster


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ALL ABSTRACTS WILL UNDERGO PEER REVIEW

ABSTRACT SUBMISSION DEADLINE MARCH 15, 2020

CONTENT of the ABSTRACT

 Submitted abstracts will be evaluated for their scientific excellence. Each abstract should begin with a background sentence and the rationale. Originality should be highlighted. Questions and/or hypothesis of research together with aims should be written. Methods including design, ethical board approval and statistics should be relevant to answer the research questions. Abstracts should present enough statistical information to indicate the robustness of the main findings. Results should answer the research questions and significants of outcomes should lead to a sound conclusion.

TEXT FORMAT

Starting Text (without bullet points)

  • Title (CAP letters)
  • Subtitle (if appropriate)
  • Authors (initials and surnames only – no first names)
  • Author affiliations to include institution name, town/city and country (please try to limit affiliations to a reasonable number)
  • Contact email address for reader inquiries

The title should be in bold capitals (upper case), flush to the left margin.  On a new line, after a line space, the authors’ names should start with their initials, each followed by a full stop before the surname (eg.  F. Smith, A.C.N. Gray, etc).  No medical degrees or appointments should be included. 

Leave one line space before beginning abstract.

 

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING IMPORTANT POINTS: 

  • The text of each abstract should be approximately 250 words, and ideally no more than 600
  • Each abstract MUST be set on a new page and MUST fit on a single page
  • Each abstract should include one email address for a nominated author, for reader inquiries
  • Each abstract must include the source of study (minimum: town/city and country)
  • The following items are NOT permitted and will be deleted from submitted files if found, but should be deleted prior to submission to us:

 illustrations, tables, references, author qualifications, author first names, author titles, session titles/numbers

  • Please do not use bullet points, asterisks, or any non-standard characters if possible – they have a tendency to corrupt or convert into question marks/ square boxes, etc. which then require to be deleted.

 Posters – We do NOT publish posters; if found in the file, they will be deleted.

 Underlining/Italic Type – Underlining, or italic type may be used to stress words or phrases. Latin names should be set in italics if possible.

Capitals – Use capitals for proper names, titles, geographical names, trade names.

Abbreviations – Abbreviations not in common use should be spelled out in full the first time they occur in a typescript, followed by the abbreviation in brackets. Abbreviations should not be used in the title of the abstract. Example:  Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

Short names (of countries, institutions, honours) and well-known acronyms are abbreviated without full stops and without a space between the letters. Examples:  USA, UK, PM (Prime Minister), ESR, WBC, FRS, BA

Decimals – (point on line), 0.78 (not 78), 20 g (not 20.0 g); one-half, three-quarters (in text only)

EXAMPLE ABSTRACT: The following page shows an example of a correctly typed abstract. Please take a look:

CHANGE IN TUMOUR VOLUME AS A MEASURE OF CHEMOTHERAPY-INDUCED NECROSIS IN EWING’S SARCOMA OF THE BONE

  1. Abudu, R.J. Grimer, M. Davies, P. Pynsent, D.C. Mangham, R.M. Tillman,

    S.R. Carter

    Royal Orthopaedic Hospital Oncology Service, Birmingham B31 2AP, UK

    Email: x@x.com

Reduction in tumour volume following chemotherapy may in part be due to necrosis of neoplastic cells, reduction of the supporting stroma or resolution of tumour-induced inflammation.   We analyzed the CT/MRI scans and histology of 50 patients with Ewing’s sarcoma of the bone treated between 1983 and 1993 to determine the correlation between change in tumour volume and tumour necrosis following chemotherapy; and determine the influence of tumour necrosis and change in tumour volume on prognosis.  The mean age was 18 years (range 5 to 40 years), and 40 of the tumours were located in the extremities, and ten centrally.  The volume at diagnosis varied from 31 ml to 1790 ml.

There was a negative correlation between observed change in volume and necrosis (r = 0.73, p = 0.0001).  Tumour progression, despite chemotherapy, was only seen in those with less than 60% necrosis.  The relapse-free survival and overall survival were 71% and 78%, respectively, for those with more than 90% necrosis, and 37% and 59%, respectively, for those with less than 90% necrosis (p = < 0.05).  Though the outcome in patients with more than 40% tumour volume reduction was better than those with less than 40% reduction, this did not reach statistical significance.  We found no relationship between tumour volume and serum lactate dehydrogenase levels at diagnosis.  Patient’s weight, sex, body mass index and tumour site did not affect change in tumour volume following chemotherapy or the observed tumour necrosis.

We conclude that change in tumour volume is a good predictor of chemotherapy-induced necrosis and that necrosis is a strong prognostic factor in Ewing’s sarcoma of the bone.

**All oral abstracts will be published in The Bone & Joint Journal